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Syllabus Cognitive Behavioral Psychotherapy - 51823
עברית
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Last update 22-08-2018
HU Credits: 2

Degree/Cycle: 2nd degree (Master)

Responsible Department: Psychology

Semester: 1st Semester

Teaching Languages: Hebrew

Campus: Mt. Scopus

Course/Module Coordinator: Prof. Jonathan Huppert


Coordinator Office Hours: Sun 14:00

Teaching Staff:
Prof Jonathan Huppert

Course/Module description:
this is an introduction to CBT course for MA clinical students. it will provide the basis for understanding what CBT is, what the underlying theories are, and when it can be used. In addition, basic techniques will be learned

Course/Module aims:
The course objectives are: 1) Study of classic and contemporary works on the subject of CBT. 2) the acquisition of CBT tools that can be used in CBT or integrated 3) present practicum cases to discuss their suitability for the treatment of CBT or integrative treatment

Learning outcomes - On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
By the end of the course students will be able to:
1. State the basic premises of behavioral (operant and respondent) and cognitive theories.
2. Describe the nature of the therapeutic relationship in the context of CBT
3. Report the basics related to assessment in CBT
4. Develop a preliminary CBT case conceptualization
5. Know how to structure a CBT session and work with clients collaboratively.
6. Describe general empirical findings regarding the efficacy of CBT and know how to seek further information regarding its application to a specific case
7. conduct a number basic CBT techniques related to cognitions, behaviors, and emotions
8. understand the importance of taking into account the influence of culture/religion/personality/and other factors in their delivery of CBT methods.

Attendance requirements(%):
100%

Teaching arrangement and method of instruction: Lectures, discussions, video tapes, role play and case presentations

Course/Module Content:
I. Introduction to CBT
CBT as cognitive-behavioral therapy

II. Foundations of CBT
III. Building the alliance in CBT
IV. Case formulation in CBT
V. Beck's model
VI. Socratic questioning
VII. Schema change

VIII. Exposure
IX. Assertiveness training
X. Problem solving
XI. Personality disorders

Required Reading:
Boswell, J.F., Sharpless, B.A., Greenberg, L.S., Heatherington, L., Huppert, J.D., Barber, J.P., Goldfried M.R., & Castonguay, L.G. (2010). Schools of Psychotherapy and the Beginnings of a Scientific Approach. In Barlow, D.H., (Ed), Oxford Handbook of Clinical Psychology. NY: Oxford University Press
Huppert, J.D. (2011) יסודות הטיפול הקוגניטיבי-התנהגותי. (In Marom, S. Gilboa-Schechtman E., Eds.) Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adults: An integrative approach. To be published by Probook, Israel (can skip the first 5 pages that are similar to the previous chapter)
Optional: Beck, AT (1976). Cognitive Content of Emotional Disorders (Chapter 4). Cognitive Therapy and the Emotional Disorders. Madison, CT: International Universities Press, pp. 76-102.
Beck, A.T., Rush, A.J., Shaw, B.F., & Emory, G. (1979). An Overview (Chapter 1). Cognitive Therapy of Depression. New York: Guilford Press, pp. 1-33.
Clark, D.M. (1986). A cognitive approach to panic. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 24, 461-470.


Huppert, J.D. & Elizur, J. The therapeutic relationship in CBT.
Huppert, J.D. (2011)המשגה הטיפול הקוגניטיבי-התנהגותי. (In Marom, S. Gilboa-Schechtman E., Eds.) Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adults: An integrative approach. To be published by Probook, Israel

Additional Reading Material:
Fairburn, C.G., Cooper, Z., Shafran, R., & Wilson, G.T. (2008). Eating Disorders: A Transdiagnostic Protocol. In (Barlow, D.H., Ed.) Clinical Handbook of Psychological Disorders. New York: Guilford Press, pp. 578-614.
Foa, E. B., & Kozak, M. J. (1986). Emotional processing of fear: Exposure to corrective information. Psychological Bulletin, 99, 20-35.
Linehan, M.M. & Dexter-Maza, E.T. (2008). Dialectical Behavior Therapy. In (Barlow, D.H., Ed.) Clinical Handbook of Psychological Disorders. New York: Guilford Press, pp. 365-420.
*Young, J. E., Klosko, J.S., & Weishaar, M.E. (2003). Schema Therapy: Conceptual Model. In Schema Therapy: A practioner’s guide. New York: Guilford Press, pp. 1-62.
Beck, AT (1976). Cognitive Content of Emotional Disorders (Chapter 4). Cognitive Therapy and the Emotional Disorders. Madison, CT: International Universities Press, pp. 76-102.
Beck, A.T., Rush, A.J., Shaw, B.F., & Emory, G. (1979). An Overview (Chapter 1). Cognitive Therapy of Depression. New York: Guilford Press, pp. 1-33.
Clark, D.M. (1986). A cognitive approach to panic. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 24, 461-470.

Hays, P. A. (2009). Integrating evidence-based practice, cognitive-behavior therapy, and multicultural therapy: Ten steps for culturally competent practice. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 40(4), 354-360.

Mennin, D. S. & Farach, F. (2007). Emotion and Evolving Treatments for Adult

Course/Module evaluation:
End of year written/oral examination 0 %
Presentation 0 %
Participation in Tutorials 10 %
Project work 60 %
Assignments 30 %
Reports 0 %
Research project 0 %
Quizzes 0 %
Other 0 %

Additional information:
Assignments: required readings (*)for each class according to the syllabus; at the end of the semester students will submit a paper approximately 4-6 pages that describes a current case and provides a conceptualization and connected to the reading in the course.
 
Students needing academic accommodations based on a disability should contact the Center for Diagnosis and Support of Students with Learning Disabilities, or the Office for Students with Disabilities, as early as possible, to discuss and coordinate accommodations, based on relevant documentation.
For further information, please visit the site of the Dean of Students Office.
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