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Syllabus Political Communication in the 21st Century: Advanced Topics - 50128

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Last update 06-10-2021
HU Credits: 2

Degree/Cycle: 1st degree (Bachelor)

Responsible Department: Communication & Journalism

Semester: 2nd Semester

Teaching Languages: Hebrew

Campus: Mt. Scopus

Course/Module Coordinator: Dr. Eran Amsalem

Coordinator Email: eran.amsalem@mail.huji.ac.il

Coordinator Office Hours: Tuesday, 12:00-13:00, Room 5408

Teaching Staff:
Dr. Eran Amsalem

Course/Module description:
This course reviews major developments in the field of political communication over the past two decades. The course covers issues such as communication effects on partisan polarization, the dissemination and correction of political misinformation, the relationship between political communication and the rise of populism, and more.

Course/Module aims:

Learning outcomes - On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Describe some of the major developments in the field of political communication over the past two decades.

Attendance requirements(%):
80%

Teaching arrangement and method of instruction: Each class will begin with a lecture, which will be followed by a discussion based on the lecture and the weekly assigned readings.

Course/Module Content:
Introduction: Political communication in the 21st century

Political communication and polarization - part 1 (mass media)

Political communication and polarization - part 2 (interpersonal communication)

Political communication and populism

Exposure to diverse views on social media

The effects of the Internet on political engagement

Political incivility

Communication effects on political knowledge and learning

Psychophysiological research in political communication

The dissemination and correction of political misinformation

Required Reading:
Political communication and polarization - part 1
Wilson, A. E., Parker, V., & Feinberg, M. (2020). Polarization in the contemporary political and media landscape. Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences, 34, 223-228.

Political communication and polarization - part 2
Amsalem, E., Merkley, E., & Loewen, P. J. (2021). Does talking to the other side reduce inter-party hostility? Evidence from three studies. Advance online publication, Political Communication. doi:10.1080/10584609.2021.1955056

Political communication and populism
de Vreese, C. H., Esser, F., Aalberg, T., Reinemann, C., & Stanyer, J. (2018). Populism as an expression of political communication content and style: A new perspective. The International Journal of Press/Politics, 23(4), 423-438.

Exposure to diverse views on social media
Bakshy, E., Messing, S., & Adamic, L. A. (2015). Exposure to ideologically diverse news and opinion on Facebook. Science, 348, 1130-1132.

The effects of the internet on political engagement
Putnam, R. (2020). Bowling alone: The collapse and revival of American community. Afterword (pp. 415-444). New York: Simon & Schuster.

Political incivility
Frimer, J. A., & Skitka, L. J. (2018). The Montagu Principle: Incivility decreases politicians public approval, even with their political base. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 115(5), 845.

Communication effects on political knowledge and learning
Kleinberg, M. S., & Lau, R. R. (2019). The importance of political knowledge for effective citizenship: Differences between the broadcast and internet generations. Public Opinion Quarterly, 83(2), 338-362.

Psychophysiological research in political communication
Bakker, B. N., & Schumacher, G., & Rooduijn, M. (2020). Hot politics: Affective responses to political communication. Advance online publication, American Political Science Review. Available at: https://osf.io/dqc74/files/

The dissemination and correction of political misinformation
Thorson, E. (2016). Belief echoes: The persistent effects of corrected misinformation. Political Communication, 33(3), 460-480.

Additional Reading Material:
Political communication and polarization
Arceneaux, K., & Johnson, M. (2013). Changing minds or changing channels? (Chapter 4). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Druckman, J. N., Levendusky, M. S., & McLain, A. (2018). No need to watch: How the effects of partisan media can spread via interpersonal discussions. American Journal of Political Science, 62(1), 99-112.
Iyengar, S., Lelkes, Y., Levendusky, M., Malhotra, N., & Westwood, S. J. (2019). The origins and consequences of affective polarization in the United States. Annual Review of Political Science, 22, 129-146.
Levendusky, M., & Malhotra, N. (2016). Does media coverage of partisan polarization affect political attitudes? Political Communication, 33(2), 283-301.


Political communication and populism
Bos, L., Schemer, C., Corbu, N., Hameleers, M., Andreadis, I., Schulz, A., ... & Fawzi, N. (2020). The effects of populism as a social identity frame on persuasion and mobilisation: Evidence from a 15‐country experiment. European Journal of Political Research, 59(1), 3-24.
Çinar, I., Stokes, S., & Uribe, A. (2020). Presidential rhetoric and populism. Presidential Studies Quarterly, 50(2), 240-263.
Hameleers, M., Bos, L., Fawzi, N., Reinemann, C., Andreadis, I., Corbu, N., ... & Axelsson, S. (2018). Start spreading the news: A comparative experiment on the effects of populist communication on political engagement in sixteen European countries. The International Journal of Press/Politics, 23(4), 517-538.
Jagers, J., & Walgrave, S. (2007). Populism as political communication style. European Journal of Political Research, 46(3), 319-345.
Schaub, M., & Morisi, D. (2019). Voter mobilisation in the echo chamber: Broadband internet and the rise of populism in Europe. Advance online publication, European Journal of Political Research. doi:10.1111/1475-6765.12373


Exposure to diverse views on social media
Bail, C. A., Argyle, L. P., Brown, T. W., Bumpus, J. P., Chen, H., Hunzaker, M. F., ... & Volfovsky, A. (2018). Exposure to opposing views on social media can increase political polarization. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 115(37), 9216-9221.
Gentzkow, M., & Shapiro, J. M. (2011). Ideological segregation online and offline. The Quarterly Journal of Economics, 126(4), 1799-1839.
Guess, A. M. (2021). (Almost) everything in moderation: New evidence on Americans' online media diets. Advance online publication, American Journal of Political Science. doi:10.1111/ajps.12589


The effects of the Internet on political behavior
Feezell, J. T. (2018). Agenda setting through social media: The importance of incidental news exposure and social filtering in the digital era. Political Research Quarterly, 71(2), 482-494.
Zhuravskaya, E., Petrova, M., & Enikolopov, R. (2020). Political effects of the internet and social media. Annual Review of Economics, 12, 415-438.


Political incivility
Druckman, J. N., Gubitz, S. R., Lloyd, A. M., & Levendusky, M. S. (2019). How incivility on partisan media (de)polarizes the electorate. The Journal of Politics, 81(1), 291-295.
Muddiman, A. (2017). Personal and public levels of political incivility. International Journal of Communication, 11, 2182-3202.
Mutz, D. C., & Reeves, B. (2005). The new videomalaise: Effects of televised incivility on political trust. American Political Science Review, 99(1), 1-15.
Rossini, P. (2020). Beyond incivility: Understanding patterns of uncivil and intolerant discourse in online political talk. Advance online publication, Communication Research. doi:10.1177/0093650220921314.
Skytte, R. (2020). Dimensions of elite partisan polarization: Disentangling the effects of incivility and issue polarization. Advance online publication, British Journal of Political Science. doi:10.1017/S0007123419000760


Communication effects on political knowledge and learning
de Vreese, C. H., & Boomgaarden, H. (2006). News, political knowledge and participation: The differential effects of news media exposure on political knowledge and participation. Acta Politica, 41(4), 317-341.
Fraile, M., & Iyengar, S. (2014). Not all news sources are equally informative: A cross-national analysis of political knowledge in Europe. The International Journal of Press/Politics, 19(3), 275-294.
Patterson, T. E. (2013). Informing the news. New York, NY: Vintage.


Psychophysiological research in political communication
Fournier, P., Soroka, S., & Nir, L. (2020). Negativity biases and political ideology: A comparative test across 17 countries. American Political Science Review, 114(3), 775-791.
Kruikemeier, S., Lecheler, S., & Boyer, M. M. (2018). Learning from news on different media platforms: An eye-tracking experiment. Political Communication, 35(1), 75-96.
Soroka, S., & McAdams, S. (2015). News, politics, and negativity. Political Communication, 32(1), 1-22.
Mutz, D. C., & Reeves, B. (2005). The new videomalaise: Effects of televised incivility on political trust. American Political Science Review, 99(1), 1-15.
Schmuck, D., Tribastone, M., Matthes, J., Marquart, F., & Bergel, E. M. (2020). Avoiding the other side? An eye-tracking study of selective exposure and selective avoidance effects in response to political advertising. Journal of Media Psychology: Theories, Methods, and Applications, 32(3), 158-164.


The dissemination and correction of political misinformation
Bago, B., Rand, D. G., & Pennycook, G. (2020). Fake news, fast and slow: Deliberation reduces belief in false (but not true) news headlines. Advance online publication, Journal of Experimental Psychology: General. doi:10.1037/xge0000729
Flynn, D. J., Nyhan, B., & Reifler, J. (2017). The nature and origins of misperceptions: Understanding false and unsupported beliefs about politics. Political Psychology, 38(S1), 127-150.
Humprecht, E., Esser, F., & Van Aelst, P. (2020). Resilience to online disinformation: A framework for cross-national comparative research. Advance online publication, The International Journal of Press/Politics. doi:10.1177/1940161219900126
Jerit, J., & Zhao, Y. (2020). Political misinformation. Annual Review of Political Science, 23, 77-94.
Nyhan, B., Porter, E., Reifler, J., & Wood, T. J. (2020). Taking fact-checks literally but not seriously? The effects of journalistic fact-checking on factual beliefs and candidate favorability. Political Behavior, 42, 939-960.
Tucker, J. A., Guess, A., Barberá, P., Vaccari, C., Siegel, A., Sanovich, S., Nyhan, B. (2018). Social media, political polarization, and political disinformation: A review of the scientific literature. Retrieved from: http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3144139

Course/Module evaluation:
End of year written/oral examination 0 %
Presentation 0 %
Participation in Tutorials 0 %
Project work 80 %
Assignments 0 %
Reports 20 %
Research project 0 %
Quizzes 0 %
Other 0 %

Additional information:
Grading will be based on the submission of four short responses to the reading materials during the semester (20% of the grade) and on a final paper (80%).
 
Students needing academic accommodations based on a disability should contact the Center for Diagnosis and Support of Students with Learning Disabilities, or the Office for Students with Disabilities, as early as possible, to discuss and coordinate accommodations, based on relevant documentation.
For further information, please visit the site of the Dean of Students Office.
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