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Syllabus Gender and Development - 59533
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Last update 25-10-2015
HU Credits: 2

Degree/Cycle: 2nd degree (Master)

Responsible Department: glocal community development studies

Semester: 2nd Semester

Teaching Languages: English

Campus: Mt. Scopus

Course/Module Coordinator: Dr. Amelia Weinreb

Coordinator Email: Amy.Weinreb@huji.mail.ac.il

Coordinator Office Hours: Mondays and Tuesdays

Teaching Staff:
Ms. Amelia Weinreb

Course/Module description:
Course description
Gender and development constitutes its own academic sub-field and has proven to be an enduring international policy and planning focus since the 1970s. With this in mind, the foundational questions that underlie this course are:
• Why should the issue of gender constitute a legitimate planning tradition in its own right?
• Why do the proliferating numbers of policies and plans for action in gender and development often fail to be implemented?
• How do transnational relationships shape trends in gender and development?
To address these questions, this course provides a critical overview of classical and contemporary theories of development linked to core concerns in gender and development including: sex ratio, reproductive rights, health and disease, violence, education, agriculture, urbanization and globalization. Each week a “core concepts” reading explores topic at hand in greater detail and introduces new debates.

Course/Module aims:
This course provides a critical overview of classical and contemporary theories of development linked to core concerns in gender and development including: sex ratio, reproductive rights, health and disease, violence, education, agriculture, urbanization and globalization. Each week a “core concepts” reading explores topic at hand in greater detail and introduces new debates.

Learning outcomes - On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Course Objectives
Upon completion of the course, students will have developed skills to:
• Explain when, how, and why gender emerged as a development issue
• Articulate central themes of gender and development over time
• Place course themes within in a wider context of social theory and development policy
• Converse, with historical and ethnographic sensitivity, about a range of contemporary case studies
• Analyze possible interventions based on case studies from different areas of the developing world

Attendance requirements(%):
80%

Teaching arrangement and method of instruction: Course Format
This course is designed to be a smaller-scale seminar for students interested in learning about key debates in gender and development over time, divided into two units: 1) Introducing Gender and Development: Historical roots and overview of trends; and 2) Shifting Realities: Gender and Development today. It is designed to be series of lively, interactive meetings in which students are encouraged to participate through articulating and synthesizing ideas with clarity, accuracy and thoughtfulness, and defending their positions through evidence based on our common reading list. Each meeting, the course is divided three segments:
• A brief, instructor-led discussion establishes the context and background for the readings and outlines their key arguments and ideas in the reading (15 mins).
• Two student discussion leaders, designated in advance, will raise questions, stimulate debate, and integrate ideas from the readings and course core concepts into our collective analysis, based on a 500-word reading response paper (20 mins).
• A workshop enables students to engage interactively with core elements of the reading as applied to a project or activity (30 mins).

Course/Module Content:

Unit 1

Gender and Development: Historical roots and overview of trends
Week 1

Feb. 23 Gender as a Development Issue
- Introduction to this class and its structure, and expectations.
- Opening collaborative exercise on gender and development over time
Week 2

Mar. 1 Sex Ratio
- Reasons for difference in sex ratio
- Gender differences in life expectancy
- Gendered patterns of migration

In-class workshop: Responding to female infanticide in China - Momsen, pp. 1-20 (review of Gender as a Development Issue).

- Momsen, pp. 20-46




Syllabus response: What surprises you, What captures your attention; what you look forward to; what you most dread on the syllabus?

Student leaders: 2- page papers due electronically 5pm night before class
Week 3

Mar. 8 Reproduction
- Social v. biological reproduction
- State intervention and control of reproduction
- Population planning

In-class workshop: Education level and fertility. What is empowerment? - Momsen pp. 46-78

Student leaders: 2- page papers due 5pm, night before class


DUE: Paper #1
Week 4

Mar. 16 Gender, Health and Violence
- Health problems and the lifecycle
- Changing gender patterns of HIV/AIDS and other STIs
- Violence as a health problem with social, economic political roots

In-class workshop: Honor killing and international intervention -Momsen pp. 78-109

Student leaders: 2- page papers due 5pm, night before class
Week 5

Mar. 22 Gender and Environment
- The legacy of ecofeminism
- The gendered use of natural resources
- The gendered impact of pollution and climate change

In class workshop: Women, water, and development

From topics to research questions, round 1
- Momsen pp. 109-140
Student leaders: 2- page papers due 5pm, night before class
Week 6

Mar. 29 Gender in Rural Areas
- Impact of gender roles on participation and time use in agriculture
- Regional differences in gendered employment in agriculture
- Gender and new types of rural employment

In class workshop: Gender and time use in rural areas

From topics to research questions, round 2 -Momsen pp. pp. 140-176

Student leaders: 2- page papers due 5pm, night before class







Week 7

Apr. 5 Gender and Urbanization
- Gender in the context of capitalism, modernization and cities
- Women’s marginalization in employment and informal and illegal work in cities
- Spatial distinctions of home and work in the city
- Problems with microfinance

In class workshop: rural to urban migration narratives -Momsen pp. 176-196
Student leaders: 2- page papers due 5pm, night before class


DUE: Proposal for Final collaborative Project








Unit 2

Shifting Realities: Gender and Development Today

Week 8

May 10 Gender and Globalization
- Gender, globalization and economic opportunity over the life course
- New types of employment for women provided by transnational
- Problems with microfinance
- Tourism, employment and social change

In-class workshop: Problems and solutions for microcredit in a global world
-Momsen pp. 196-230

Student leaders: 2- page papers due 5pm, night before class

Week 9

May 17 Measuring the Extent of Progress
- Women and political leadership
- The feminization of poverty
- Gender in neoliberal economies
- Women and education

In-class workshop: measuring progress in gender and development -Momsen pp. 230-255

Student leaders: 2- page papers due 5pm, night before class


Week 10

May 24 Contemporary Topics teach-in:
- Global LGBTQ Rights
- Gender and global media
- Slavery and Trafficking Women
- Gender and Human Rights
- Women and global Islam
- Women in emerging economies

In-class workshop: Presenting topics on gender and development, using graphics, captions, and fielding questions

All: Bring in 1 contemporary news article, published in the last few years on one of these contemporary topics. Be prepared to summarize and discuss.

All: Bring in 2 presentation slides which you would like to revise and on which you need critical feedback

All: Submit 2 sample questions to google docs.
Week 11

May 31
In-class Core Concepts Quiz

Week 12

Jun. 7 Student group presentations, round 1
Week 13

Jun. 14 Final party:
International food and drink

Student group presentations, round 2
final wrap-up and closure DUE: Materials for Final Group Projects



Required Reading:
Course Text
Momsen, Janet. 2013. Gender and Development. London: Routledge.

Additional Reading Material:

Course/Module evaluation:
End of year written/oral examination 0 %
Presentation 0 %
Participation in Tutorials 0 %
Project work 55 %
Assignments 0 %
Reports 0 %
Research project 0 %
Quizzes 25 %
Other 20 %
Participation

Additional information:
Course Requirements and Grading

20%: Seminar participation, engagement with readings, discussion leadership and attendance
Regular attendance is not only the key to individual student success as a student in this course, but also for the quality of the course as a dynamic whole. Arriving late and leaving early disrupt class flow, so make every effort to arrive to class on time with your materials prepared, and phones off. This is a highly interpersonal and interactive seminar, and while students may take notes on their computers if they are accustomed to doing so, there will be times I will ask students to shut down all electronics and interact without them. Since this is an afternoon course and we will all need an energy boost, coffee, tea and light refreshments will be served, and all students will be asked to help keep our refreshment supplies stocked.

5% Discussion leadership paper : When you lead discussion (with a partner), each individual in that pair will write their own 500-word, double spaced paper that poses a question, and then answers that question based on the reading for that day. These questions should be designed to be engaging, thought provoking and informative, stimulate discussion and debate, and will help you navigate the course. Be sure the 500-word paper:
a) States your question clearly in bold font
b) Includes an answer
The answer can be creative, and include reflections, reactions, critical commentaries or overviews. However, the short papers will be graded on their writing quality, attention to facts, examples and details that appear in the assigned reading for the day reading as well your thoughtfulness. The 500-word typed responses are due to me as an email attachment by 5pm the evening before your student group leads discussion, and I recommend bringing a printed copy for your own reference on the day that you lead.

20%: Proposal of research question, research design, and work-plan for final project
Groups of 3-5 students will select a case study on gender and development and submit a three-page mini-proposal. I will provide a rubric that may serve as both the guide for constructing the project in advance and that will also serve as the scorecard for grading the proposals, which require the following elements:
a) Presents a clear research question that begins with “how” or “why”
b) Establishes the historical, political and cultural context to explore the question
c) Summarizes the debates surrounding the question, based on a literature review
d) Summarizes theories that help frame answers to the question
e) Provides a description of the interventions that attempted to address the problem, if any
f) Offers an analysis of why the intervention succeeded and failed, why, and by what measures
g) Describes the nature of the secondary data to be collected for the project
h) Outlines a flexible but thorough six-week work plan describing how each group member will carry out their project as a team.

30% Final Collaborative Project:
The Student groups will present a final project based on their research proposal. I will provide a rubric that may serve as both the guide for constructing the final project in advance and that will also serve as a scorecard for grading. The final project will be composed of a maximum of 20 presentation slides addressing the gender and development question posed in the proposal, and an accompanying 3-5 page “executive summary.”
 
Students needing academic accommodations based on a disability should contact the Center for Diagnosis and Support of Students with Learning Disabilities, or the Office for Students with Disabilities, as early as possible, to discuss and coordinate accommodations, based on relevant documentation.
For further information, please visit the site of the Dean of Students Office.
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