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Syllabus DEVELOPMENT & GLOBAL HEALTH: A CRITICAL APPROACH TO THEORY POLICY AND PRACTICE - 59527
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Last update 02-10-2017
HU Credits: 2

Degree/Cycle: 2nd degree (Master)

Responsible Department: glocal international development

Semester: 1st Semester

Teaching Languages: English

Campus: Mt. Scopus

Course/Module Coordinator: Dr Maureen Malowany

Coordinator Email: maureenm@ekmd.huji.ac.il

Coordinator Office Hours: By appointment

Teaching Staff:
Dr. Maureen Malowany

Course/Module description:
Using case studies drawn largely but not exclusively from Sub-Saharan Africa, this course explores the challenges and complexities of delivering health in under-resourced settings. Over the past sixty years, various development models and policies have been applied locally and globally in all areas. Using the social determinants of health model, this course explores those underlying political, social and economic conditions that impact upon the organisation and delivery of health. We will critically examine the theory and practice that underlies what has become ‘global health’ within an evolving theoretical and applied development framework.

Course/Module aims:
• To introduce contemporary approaches and contributions to health, development and global health
• To interrogate how cultural values, social practices and political interests mediate the production of health within the knowledge and policy frameworks of development
• To understand how health and development research/policy/practice inform institutional structures, strategies of governance, practices of citizenship and global well-being

Learning outcomes - On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
• Critically examine health interventions in under-resourced settings
• Identify the theoretical models and paradigms that inform health intervention and policy programs
• Integrate social determinants of health into the analysis of health interventions
• Assess efficacy and equity of health policy platforms at the global level

Attendance requirements(%):
90

Teaching arrangement and method of instruction: Lectures, seminar style class discussions, student presentations

Course/Module Content:
Hebrew University
Glocal Community Development Studies
Health, Development and Global Health: A critical approach to theory, policy and practice

Course Number (2 credits): 59527
First Semester 2017-2018
Mondays: 16:30-18:00; Room 2305
Instructor: Dr. Maureen Malowany
maureenm@ekmd.huji.ac.il
Office Hours: By appointment

Course Description

Using case studies drawn largely but not exclusively from Sub-Saharan Africa, this course explores the challenges and complexities of delivering health in under-resourced settings. Over the past sixty years, various development models and policies have been applied locally and globally. We will critically examine the theory and practice that underlies what has become ‘global health’ within an evolving development framework.
Course Objectives
• To introduce contemporary approaches and contributions to health, development and global health
• To interrogate how cultural values, social practices and political interests mediate the production of health within the knowledge and policy frameworks of development
• To apprehend how health and development research/policy/practice inform institutional structures, strategies of governance, practices of citizenship and global well-being

Course Requirements and Evaluation
Before each class, students are required to read the relevant Assigned Reading (Recommended Readings are optional). If possible, all readings and presentations will be placed on Moodle. Each week, students will be asked to draw from the reading(s) to provide a short response (2-3 pages-max 500 words). When required, Guiding Questions will be given to assist with the readings.

Assessment: The student will submit a portfolio which will include three student-selected responses to be assessed (30%); a presentation on a case study of a health/development/global health problem in a group or individually (40%); and a written essay on this case study (1000 words) (30%).

Please note that Hebrew University policies apply with regard to plagiarism.

Course Overview

Please note that readings may be changed/adapted through the semester to reflect interests of the class.



PART 1: Setting the Contexts
Week 1, October 23: Introduction

Recommended Reading:
Ay, Pinar, et al., The influence of gender roles on health seeking behaviour during pregnancy in Turkey, The European Journal Of Contraception & Reproductive Health Care Vol. 14 , Iss. 4, 2009.

Week 2, October 20: Problematising Health, Development, Global Health: Social Determinants of Health

Assigned Reading:
Marmot, Michael, et al. Closing the gap in a generation: health equity through action on the social determinants of health. Lancet 2008; 372: 1661-69.

Farmer, Paul, et al., ed., Reimagining Global Health. Introduction. Berkeley: Univ. of California Press, 2013, 1-14.

Recommended Reading:
Marmot, Michael. Achieving health equity: from root causes to fair outcomes. Lancet 2007; 370: 1153-63
Jim Yong Kim, Paul Farmer, Michael E Porter, Redefining global health-care delivery, The Lancet 2013; 382: 1060–69


Week 3, November 6: Linking Development to Health

Assigned Reading:
Pfeiffer, James. International NGOs and primary health care in Mozambique:
the need for a new model of collaboration Social Science & Medicine 56 (2003) 725–738.

Prince, Ruth J., Seeking Incorporation? Voluntary Labor and the Ambiguities of Work, Identity, and Social Value in Contemporary Kenya, African Studies Review 58 (2): 85-109 (September 2015).

Recommended Reading:
Prah Ruger, Jennifer. Health and social justice , Lancet 2004; 364: 1075–80.

Week 4, November 13 : Health, Disease and Healing: Incorporating Traditional Healers and Faith-based institutions in health-care delivery; Roles of TBAs in Medicalised Health Systems

Assigned Reading:
Titaley, C. et al. Why do some women still prefer traditional birth attendants and home delivery? a qualitative study on delivery care services in West Java Province, Indonesia
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth 2010, 10:43 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2393/10/43



Rosenthal, Anat (2015): “Doing the Best We Can”: Providing Care in a
Malawian Antiretroviral Clinic, Medical Anthropology, DOI: 10.1080/01459740.2015.1076409

Recommended Reading:

Marks, Shula. What is Colonial about Colonial Medicine? And What
Has Happened to Imperialism and Health? Social History of Medicine, 1997.


PART 2: From Health for All to Health in All:

Week 5, November 20 : PLEASE NOTE THIS CLASS WILL BE RESCHEDULED
From Health to Global Health: Epidemiological and Demographic Transitions

Assigned Reading:
P. Drobac, et al. Comprehensive and integrated district health systems strengthening: the Rwanda Population Health Implementation and Training (PHIT) Partnership
BMC Health Services Research 2013, 13(Suppl 2):S5. http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6963/13/S2/S5E

Week 6, May 8: Health, Disease, Predicaments and Politics
What about Human Rights - Health - Development?

Assigned Reading:
Lawrence O. Gostin et al., The next WHO Director-General’s highest priority: a Global Treaty on the Human Right to Health, The Lancet, Vol. 4, December 2016, published online October 13, 2016 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2214-109X (16)30219-4.

Whiteside, Alan. HIV/AIDS and Development: Failures of Vision and Imagination , International Affairs, HIV/AIDS-Special Issue Vol. 82, No. 2, (Mar., 2006), pp. 327-343.
Recommended Reading:
Epstein, Steven. The Construction of Lay Expertise: AIDS Activism and the Forging of Credibility in the Reform of Clinical Trials, Science, Technology, & Human Values, Vol. 20, No. 4, Special Issue: Constructivist Perspectives on Medical Work: Medical Practices and Science and Technology Studies (Autumn,1995), pp. 408-437.

Week 7, November 27 : Governance, Health & Development

Assigned Reading:
Buse, K., & Walt, G.. (2000). Global public-private partnerships: part II - what are the health issues for global governance?. Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 78(5), 699-709. https://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S0042-96862000000500015
Siddiqi, Sameen, et al., Framework for assessing governance of the health system in
developing countries: Gateway to good governance, Health Policy 90 (2009) 13–25.

Recommended Reading:
K. Lee & D. Fidler, Avian and pandemic influenza: Progress and problems
with global health governance, Global Public Health: An International Journal for Research, Policy and Practice, 2:3, 2007, 215-234, DOI: 10.1080/17441690601136947

Farmer, Paul, An Anthropology of Structural Violence, Current Anthropology Volume 45, Number 3, June 2004.

Lewis, Maureen, Governance and Corruption in Public Health Care Systems, The Center for Global Development, Working Paper Number 78, January 2006.

Week 8, December 4: Mental Health

Assigned Reading:
Martin Prince, Vikram Patel, Shekhar Saxena, Mario Maj, Joanna Maselko, Michael R Phillips, Atif Rahman, No health without mental health Lancet 2007; 370: 859–77.
Published Online September 4, 2007, DOI:10.1016/S0140-6736(07)61238-0

N.B. Global Mental Health 1: This is the first in a Series of
six papers about global mental health

Vikram Patel, Niall Boyce, Pamela Y Collins, Shekhar Saxena, Richard Horton, A renewed agenda for global mental health, The Lancet, Vol 378, October 22, 2011; Published Online,October 17, 2011 DOI:10.1016/S0140-6736(11)61385-8.


PART 3: Taking the theories to the field – to practice

Week 9, December 11 : Ethics and Medical Research
PLEASE NOTE THIS CLASS DATE WILL BE CHANGED

Assigned Reading:
Sassy Molyneux, P. Wenzel Geissler. Ethics and the ethnography of medical research in Africa, Social Science & Medicine 67 (2008) 685-695.

Callahan, Daniel and Bruce Jennings. Ethics and Public Health, American Journal of Public Health, February 2002, Vol. 92, No. 2.
Shuchman, Miriam, Ebola vaccine trial in west Africa faces criticism, The Lancet, Vol. 385 May 16, 2015, Published Online May 13, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(15)60938-2.

Recommended Reading:

C.S. Molyneux, N. Peshua, K. Marsh, Trust and informed consent: insights from community members on the Kenyan coast, Social Science & Medicine 61 (2005) 1463–1473.

David M. Kent, MD, et al., Clinical Trials in Sub-Saharan Africa and Established Standards of Care: A Systematic Review of HIV, Tuberculosis, and Malaria Trials, JAMA, July 14, 2004, Vol 292, No. 2s.

Nancy E. Kass, et al.,The Structure and Function of Research Ethics Committees in Africa: A Case Study, PLoS Medicine Policy Forum, January 2007, Volume 4, Issue 1.


Weeks 10 and 11, December 18, January 1: Refugees, Internally Displaced Persons and Health)
December 25: University closed, no classes

Assigned Reading (Class 1):

Bayard Roberts, et al., An exploration of social determinants of health amongst internally displaced persons in northern Uganda, Conflict and Health 2009, 3:10 doi:10.1186/1752-1505-3-10.

Julie R Garon and Walter A Orenstein, Overcoming barriers to polio eradication in conflict areas, The Lancet, Vol. 15, October 2015. Published Online July 13, 2015. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(15)00008-0.

Steven van de Vijver, Samuel Oti, Clement Oduor, Alex Ezeh, Joep Lange, Charles Agyemang, Catherine Kyobutungi, Challenges of health programmes in slums, The Lancet, Published online October 7, 2015 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(15)00385-2

Recommended Reading:
Matthew Porter and Nick Haslam, Predisplacement and Postdisplacement
Factors Associated With Mental Health of Refugees and Internally Displaced Persons
A Meta-analysis, JAMA, August 3, 2005, Vol 294, No. 5.

Assigned Reading (Class 2): Selected articles from The Lancet Series on “Health in Humanitarian Crises”, June 2017


PART 4: Group/Individual Presentations
Weeks 12 and 13, January 8 and 15

Last Class, January 22, 2018: Overview plus Course Evaluation


Required Reading:
See above

Additional Reading Material:
See above

Course/Module evaluation:
End of year written/oral examination 0 %
Presentation 30 %
Participation in Tutorials 10 %
Project work 0 %
Assignments 30 %
Reports 0 %
Research project 30 %
Quizzes 0 %
Other 0 %

Additional information:
 
Students needing academic accommodations based on a disability should contact the Center for Diagnosis and Support of Students with Learning Disabilities, or the Office for Students with Disabilities, as early as possible, to discuss and coordinate accommodations, based on relevant documentation.
For further information, please visit the site of the Dean of Students Office.
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