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Syllabus From State Failure to State Building: Lessons from Europe - 56982

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Last update 01-09-2016
HU Credits: 2

Degree/Cycle: 2nd degree (Master)

Responsible Department: political science

Semester: 2nd Semester

Teaching Languages: English

Campus: Mt. Scopus

Course/Module Coordinator: Dr. Timea Spitka

Coordinator Email: timea.spitka@mail.huji.ac.il

Coordinator Office Hours: Mondays 11-12

Teaching Staff:
Dr. Timea Spitka

Course/Module description:
Sovereignty has traditionally been defined as an absolute and continuing power of the state over the people who reside in it. In light state failure, territorial partitioning and external interventions into the internal affairs of the state, the notion of a state with absolute power is an oxymoron. Failed states can have dire consequences and have become the bogeyman in the last decade. Does a weaker state necessarily mean a weaker citizen? Focusing on state failures and formation of new states of former Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia, this class will examine the current power of the state and the strength of the civilian.

Course/Module aims:
The course aims to teach about the current weakness and strength of states in light of the increasing strength of supranational organizations such as the EU and UN. Does a weak state increase or decrease the strength of the citizen? Focusing on State failures and formation of new states in former Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia, the class will examine the current power of the state vis a vis its citizens.

Learning outcomes - On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Upon successful completion of this module, students will be able to comprehend the current scholarly discussions on the state, international intervention in state affairs and the rights of citizens. Students will also gain knowledge on the collapse of Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia, the formation of new states and external intervention in former and new states.

Attendance requirements(%):
10 %

Teaching arrangement and method of instruction: The course will combine lectures and class discussions. Students will be expected to come to the class having read the assigned reading. Each class at least one student will be responsible for an analysis of the reading.

Course/Module Content:
This class consists of lectures, discussions, student presentations and individual research by students on a topic of their choosing. Although the focus of the lectures will be on fluctuations of the state in the countries of former Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia, students can research the strength of the state versus the power of the citizen in any current or recent international context.

Course Schedule
1. Introduction: The State Failure: Causes and Consequences
2. The Problem of Weak States
3. Failed State and Sharing of Sovereignty
4. Formation of New States and the Law of Statehood
5. States and Citizenship: Gaps in Capacity, Security and Legitimacy
6. Group Rights, Ethnofederalism and the Collapse of States In Eastern Europe and the Balkans
7. Disintegration of Czechoslovakia
8. The Collapse of Yugoslavia
9. Conflicts in Former Yugoslavia
10. Bosnia: International Intervention &Trusteeship in Bosnia and Herzegovina
11. NATO and Recognition of Kosovo
12. Individual Rights, Group Rights and Institutionalization of Ethnicity
13. The citizen and Legitimacy of the State
14. Summary & Student Presentations


Required Reading:
Course Schedule

1. Introduction: The State Failure: Causes and Consequences
Robert I Rotberg, The Failure and Collapse of Nation-States: Breakdown, Prevention, and Repair in When States Fail, Princeton University Press, 2003. (Background reading not required)

2. The Problem of Weak States
R: James D. Fearon and David D. Laitin, Neotrusteeship and the Problem of Weak States, International Security, Vol. 28, No 4, 2004, p. 5-43.

3. Failed State and Sharing of Sovereignty
R: Stephen D. Krasner, Sharing Sovereignty: New Institutions for Collapsed and Failing States, International Security, Volume 29, No. 2, 2004, p. 85 120

4. Formation of New States and the Law of Statehood
R: Jure Vidmar, Territorial Integrity and the Law of Statehood, George Washington International Law Review, 2013 (p. 677 747 This is a legal text and although it is very interesting and relevant for the class, students are not required to read the whole text but rather some sections and use it as a reference)

5. States and Citizenship: Gaps in Capacity, Security and Legitimacy
R: Charles T. Call, Beyond the Failed State: Towards a Conceptual Alternative, European Journal of IR, Vol.17, No.2, 2010, p. 303-326.

6. Group Rights, Ethnofederalism and the Collapse of States In Eastern Europe and the Balkans
R: Henry E Hale, Divided We Stand: Institutional Sources of Ethnofederal State Survival and Collapse, World Politics, Vol. 56, No 2, 2004, p. 165-193

7. Disintegration of Czechoslovakia
R: Sharon L. Wolchik, The Politics of Ethnicity in Post Communist Czechoslovakia, East European Politics and Societies, Vol. 8, No. 1, Winter 1994 p. 153 - 188

8. The Collapse of Yugoslavia
R: Karlo Basta, Non-ethnic Origins of Ethnofederal institutions: the case of Yugoslavia, Nationalism and Ethnic Politics, 2010 - Taylor & Francis, p. 92-110.

9. Conflicts in Former Yugoslavia
R: Anthony Oberschall, The manipulation of ethnicity: from ethnic cooperation to violence and war in Yugoslavia, Ethnic and Racial Studies, Vol. 23, No. 6, Nov. 2000, p. 982-1001.

10. Bosnia: International Intervention &Trusteeship in Bosnia and Herzegovina
R: Timea Spitka, Bosnia and Herzegovina: Catch 22 in International Nation Building, Chapter 5 in International Intervention, Identity and Conflict Transformation: Building Bridges and Walls. Routledge 2015.

11. NATO and Recognition of Kosovo
R:Lawrence Freedman, Victims and Victors, Reflections on the Kosovo War, Review of International Studies, Vol 26, No. 3, 2000, p. 335-358.

12. Individual Rights, Group Rights and Institutionalization of Ethnicity
R:Florian Bieber, Institutionalizing Ethnicity in the Western Balkans: Managing Change in Deeply Divided Societies, European Centre for Minority Issues, 2004, 1-25

13. The citizen and Legitimacy of the State
R:Bruce Gilley, The Meaning and Measure of State Legitimacy: Results for 72 Countries, European Journal of Political Research, 45, 2006, p.499-525.

14. Summary & Student Presentations




Additional Reading Material:

Course/Module evaluation:
End of year written/oral examination 0 %
Presentation 10 %
Participation in Tutorials 10 %
Project work 70 %
Assignments 10 %
Reports 0 %
Research project 0 %
Quizzes 0 %
Other 0 %

Additional information:
Grading
Class Participation: 10%
Students are expected to come to class having read the required material that will be discussed in class.
Class Presentation: 10 %
Each student will briefly present the progress of his or her research in the class. Students will be encouraged to discuss the research of their peers and class comments will contribute to improving the final paper.
Analysis of reading: 10%:
Each student will present a summary and an analysis of a required reading.
Research Paper: 70%
Research paper will be on a topic chosen by the student in consultation with the lecturer having to do with some aspect of a link between the strength of the state and power of the citizen within the current international context. Length of the research paper should be around 5,000 words.
 
Students needing academic accommodations based on a disability should contact the Center for Diagnosis and Support of Students with Learning Disabilities, or the Office for Students with Disabilities, as early as possible, to discuss and coordinate accommodations, based on relevant documentation.
For further information, please visit the site of the Dean of Students Office.
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