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Syllabus PUBLIC DIPLOMACY - 56804

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Last update 11-10-2015
HU Credits: 4

Degree/Cycle: 2nd degree (Master)

Responsible Department: political science

Semester: Yearly

Teaching Languages: Hebrew

Campus: Mt. Scopus

Course/Module Coordinator: Prof. Tamir Sheafer, Dr. Shaul Shenhav


Coordinator Office Hours: Prof. Tamir Sheafer:
Monday , 14:00-15:00, room 4311. Prof. Shaul Shenhav: Monday, 10:15-11:30, room 4322.

Teaching Staff:
Prof Tamir Sheafer
Prof Shaul Shenhav

Course/Module description:
The term "Public Diplomacy" refers to efforts made by states and other international players to promote their interests (political, economic, etc.) in foreign countries, by influencing the public in those countries. In Israel, the term "Hasbara" is often used to describe this process. Public Diplomacy includes the use of soft power, in contrary to military or economic power.
Mediated Public Diplomacy, as a part of this process, is the process in which international players are trying to promote their strategic messages in the media of the target states. In an era when large wars are rare and the media are becoming central in the international arena, it appears that the importance and centrality of mediated public diplomacy increases.
In the course we will examine various aspects of public diplomacy, including strategic and tactical issues, rhetoric and framing, promotion of messages in the media, the role of values and culture, the relative proximity between states, and more.
The students in the course will analyze public diplomacy campaigns and carry out empirical research of their own.

Course/Module aims:
The purpose of the course is to discuss basic issues in public diplomacy and public relations, with emphasis on the ability of states to promote their interests and messages in foreign media.

Learning outcomes - On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
1. Define basic concepts in Public Diplomacy.
2. Define basic concepts in Mediated Public Diplomacy.
3. Explain the important trends and new research directions in the field of Public Diplomacy.
4. Develop a comprehensive theoretical understanding of the field, which will be the basis for an empirical research proposal.
5. Design a personal empirical study based on theoretical concepts learned during the course.

Attendance requirements(%):
80%

Teaching arrangement and method of instruction: The course includes theoretical lectures, expert guest lectures, presentations by students in the classroom and individual meetings with students on their research work (work can be done alone or in couples). Students who do not take the seminar course will be required to develop a research proposal and perform a limited exploratory research.

Course/Module Content:
Part 1 Introduction and key concepts
Key concepts
Soft power and Public Diplomacy
Legitimacy, image and the management of national reputation

Part 2 Political values, political culture and public diplomacy
Key concepts
Political values and political culture in the international arena
International media coverage map 1
International media coverage map 2

Part 3 Political values, political culture and public diplomacy
Mediated Public Diplomacy 1
Mediated Public Diplomacy 2

Part 4 Messages: Rhetoric and strategic communication
Key concepts
Messages and audiences
Strategy and message building

Part 5 Public diplomacy in action
The branding of states
Public opinion, media and foreign policy
Public diplomacy in the new media
Israel's public diplomacy

Required Reading:
Part 1 Introduction and key concepts
Key concepts
*Cull, N. J. (2008). Public Diplomacy: Taxonomies and Histories. The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 616, 31-54.
* , , 4.6.2009 http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/NewBeginning/transcripts

Soft power and Public Diplomacy
*Nye, J. (2008). Public diplomacy and soft power. The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 616(1), 94-109.

Legitimacy, image and the management of national reputation
*Suchman, M. C. (1995). Managing legitimacy: Strategic and institutional approaches. The Academy of Management Review, 20(3), 571-610.


Part 2 Political values, political culture and public diplomacy
Key concepts
*Huntington, S. P. (1993). The clash of civilizations. Foreign Affairs, 72, 22-49.

Political values and political culture in the international arena
*Schwartz, S. H. (2006). A Theory of Cultural Value Orientations: Explication and Applications. Comparative Sociology, 5(2-3), 137-182.

International media coverage map 1
* Galtung, J., & Ruge, M. H. (1970). The structure of foreign news. In J. Tunstall (Ed.) Media sociology (pp. 259-298). London: Constable Publisher.

International media coverage map 2
* Sheafer, T., Shenhav, S. R., Takens, J., & van Atteveldt, W. (2014). Relative political and value proximity in mediated public diplomacy: The effect of state-level homophily on international frame building. Political Communication, 31(1), 149-167.


Part 3 Political values, political culture and public diplomacy
Mediated Public Diplomacy 1
*Sheafer, T., and Shenhav, S. R. (2009). Mediated public diplomacy in a new era of warfare. The Communication Review, 12(3), 272-283.

Mediated Public Diplomacy 2

Part 4 Messages: Rhetoric and strategic communication
Key concepts
* Foss, S. K. (2009) Rhetorical Criticism. 4th edition. Long Grove, Illinois: Waveland Press, pp. 3-6. ( )
* Shenhav S.R. (2015) Analyzing Social Narratives. New-York: Routledge, pp. 9-19.

Messages and audiences
*Chilton P. (2004). Analyzing political discourse. New York, NY: Routledge. Chap. 9.
*Mintz, A., and Redd, S. B. (2003). Framing effects in international relations. Synthese, 135, 193213.

Strategy and message building

Part 5 Public diplomacy in action
The branding of states
*van Ham, P. (2001). The Rise of the Brand State: The Postmodern Politics of Image and Reputation. Foreign Affairs, 80(5), 2-6.

Public opinion, media and foreign policy
*Baum, M. A., and Potter, P. B. K. (2008). The relationships between mass media, public opinion, and foreign policy: Toward a theoretical synthesis. Annual Review of Political Science, 11, 39-65.

Public diplomacy in the new media
*Cull, N. J. (2011). WikiLeaks, public diplomacy 2.0 and the state of digital public diplomacy. Place Branding and Public Diplomacy (2011) 7, 1 8.

Israel's public diplomacy
*Gilboa, E. (2006). Public diplomacy: The missing component in Israels foreign policy. Israel Affairs, 12(4), 715747.

Additional Reading Material:
Part 1 Introduction and key concepts
Key concepts

Soft power and Public Diplomacy
Gilboa, E. (2000). Mass communication and diplomacy: A theoretical framework. Communication Theory, 10(3), 275-309.
Gilboa, E. (2008). Searching for a theory of public diplomacy. The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 616(1), 55-77.
Goldsmith, Benjamine E., Yusaku Horiuchi. 2009. Spinning the globe? U.S. public diplomacy and foreign public opinion. The Journal of Politics, 71, 863-875.
Manheim, J. B. (1994). Strategic public diplomacy & American foreign policy: The evolution of influence. New York: Oxford University Press. ch. 1 pp. 3-12.
Zaharna, R. S. (2009). Mapping out spectrum of public diplomacy initiatives: Information and relational communication frameworks. In Snow, N. and Taylor, P. M. (Eds.), Routledge handbook of public diplomacy (pp. 86-100). New York: Routledge.


Legitimacy, image and the management of national reputation
Boulding, K. E. (1959). National images and international systems. Conflict Resolution, 3(2), pp. 120-131.
Geva, Nehemia, and D. Christopher Hanson. 1999. Cultural similarity, foreign policy actions, and regime perception: An experimental study of international cues and democratic peace. Political Psychology, 20, 803 27.
Herrmann, R. K., Voss, J. F., Schooler, T. Y. E., & Ciarrochi, J. (1997). Images in international relations: An experimental test of cognitive schemata. International Studies Quarterly, 41, 403-433.
Jervis, R. (1970). The logic of images in international relations. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press.
Patriotta, G., Gond, J.-P. and Schultz, F. (2011). Maintaining legitimacy: Controversies, orders of worth, and public justifications. Journal of Management Studies, 48, 18041836.
Wang, J. (2006). Managing national reputation and international relations in the global era: Public diplomacy revisited. Public Relations Review, 32, 9196.


Part 2 Political values, political culture and public diplomacy
Key concepts

Political values and political culture in the international arena
Leblang, D. (2010). Familiarity breeds investment: Diaspora networks and international investment. American Political Science Review, 104(3), 584-600.
Inglehart, R., & Welzel, C. (2010). Changing mass priorities: The link between modernization and democracy. Perspectives on Politics, 8, 551-67.
Oyserman, D., & Lee, S. W. S. (2008). Does culture influence what and how we think? Effects of priming individualism and collectivism. Psychological Bulletin, 134, 311342.
Russett, B., Oneal, J. R., and Cox, M. (2000). Clash of civilizations, or realism and liberalism Déjà Vu? Some evidence. Journal of Peace Research, 37, 583608.

International media coverage map 1
Barnett, G. A., & Sung, E. (2005). Culture and the structure of the international hyperlink network. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 11(1), article 11.
Chang, T. K. (2010). Changing global media landscape, unchanging theories?: International communication research and paradigm testing. In G. J. Golan, T. J. Johnson, and W. Wanta (Eds.), International media communication in a global age (pp. 8-35). New York: Routledge.
Jones, T. M., Van Aelst, P., & Vliegenthart, R. (2013). Foreign nation visibility in U.S. news coverage: A longitudinal analysis (1950-2006). Communication Research, 40(3), 417-436.
Koopmans, R., & Vliegenthart, R. (2011). Media attention as the outcome of a diffusion processA theoretical framework and cross-national evidence on earthquake coverage. European Sociological Review, 27, 636653.
Wu, H. D. (2000). The systemic determinants of international news coverage: A comparison of 38 countries. Journal of Communication, 50, 11030.


International media coverage map 2

Part 3 Political values, political culture and public diplomacy
Mediated Public Diplomacy 1
Entman, R. M. (2008). Theorizing mediated public diplomacy: The U.S. case. Press/Politics, 13, 87-102.
Sheafer, T., and Gabay, I. (2009). Mediated public diplomacy: A strategic contest over international agenda building and frame building. Political Communication, 26(4), 447467.

Mediated Public Diplomacy 2

Part 4 Messages: Rhetoric and strategic communication
Key concepts

Messages and audiences
Hallahan, K. (1999). Seven models of framing: Implications for public relations. Journal of Public Relations Research, 11(3), 205-242.
Kuypers, J. A. and King A. (2009). What is rhetoric? In Kuypers, J. A. (Ed.), Rhetorical criticism: Perspective in action (pp. 1-12). Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.
Mor, B. D. (2007). The rhetoric of public diplomacy and propaganda wars: A view from self‐presentation theory. European Journal of Political Research, 46(5), 661-683.
Pan, Z. & Kosicki, G. M. (2003). Framing as a strategic action in public deliberation. In Reese, S. D., Gandy, O. H. Jr., & Grant, A. E. (Eds.), Framing public life: Perspectives on media and our understanding of the social world (pp. 35-66). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers.
Shenhav, S. R., Sheafer, T. and Gabay, I. (2010). Incoherent narrator: Israeli public diplomacy during the disengagement and the elections in the Palestinian Authority. Israel Studies, 15(3), 143-162.

Strategy and message building
Reagan R. Tear down this wall, speech at the Brandenburg Gate, Berlin, June, 12, 1987
http://www.historyplace.com/speeches/reagan-tear-down.htm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v&eq;5MDFX-dNtsM
Behind the scenes of the speech, from Newseum: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v&eq;-W1QBin4hHM


Part 5 Public diplomacy in action
The branding of states
Aronczyk, M. (2008). Living the Brand: Nationality, Globality and the Identity Strategies of Nation Branding Consultants. International Journal of Communication, 2, 41-65.
Avraham, E. (2009). Marketing and managing nation branding during prolonged crisis: The case of Israel. Place Branding and Public Diplomacy, 5(3), 202-212.
Gilmore, F. (2002). A country can it be repositioned? Spain the success story of country branding. Journal of Brand Management, 9, 281-293.

Public opinion, media and foreign policy
Kim, Y. S., and Barnett, G. A. (2010). The impact of global news coverage on international aid. In G. J. Golan, T. J. Johnson, and W. Wanta (Eds.), International media communication in a global age (pp. 89-108). New York: Routledge.
Todorov, A. and Mandisodza, A. N. (2004). Public opinion on foreign policy: The multilateral public that perceives itself as unilateral. Public Opinion Quarterly, 68(3), 323348.
Wlezien, C. and Soroka, S. N. (2009). The relationship between public opinion and policy. In Dalton, R. J. and Klingemann, H. (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of political behavior (pp. 799-817). New York: Oxford University Press.

Public diplomacy in the new media

Israel's public diplomacy

Course/Module evaluation:
End of year written/oral examination 0 %
Presentation 0 %
Participation in Tutorials 20 %
Project work 70 %
Assignments 0 %
Reports 0 %
Research project 0 %
Quizzes 0 %
Other 10 %
Presenting a paper at a

Additional information:
Course grade:
The course can be taken as a 4 credit points course or as a 4 credit points course + 4 other credit points for the seminar paper.
Titles for seminar paper will be discussed with the the teachers.
The grade for participation also includes an active participation in "policy challenges". These are tasks which will be conducted during class.
An additional grade will be given for presenting a paper in a "posters conference"
 
Students needing academic accommodations based on a disability should contact the Center for Diagnosis and Support of Students with Learning Disabilities, or the Office for Students with Disabilities, as early as possible, to discuss and coordinate accommodations, based on relevant documentation.
For further information, please visit the site of the Dean of Students Office.
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