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Syllabus From Protest to Terror 68 and its Aftermath - 54694

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Last update 28-06-2018
HU Credits: 2

Degree/Cycle: 2nd degree (Master)

Responsible Department: Cont. German Studies:politics, Soc.&Cult

Semester: 1st Semester

Teaching Languages: English

Campus: Mt. Scopus

Course/Module Coordinator: Dr. Tobias Ebbrecht-Hartmann


Coordinator Office Hours: Wednesday, 10-12

Teaching Staff:
Dr. Tobias Ebbrecht Hartmann

Course/Module description:
The prostest movement of 1968 had an important impact on the West German society. Then mostly joint by students the protests are today interpreted as a turning point towards more democracy and political participation. But what was the context of these protests? What happened in East Germany? How was it possible that parts of the protest movement transformed their political strategy into terrorism? The course aims toe review the protest movement of 1968, its terrorist aftermath, the impact it had on the German society and the memories of protest and terrorism.

Course/Module aims:
The course will provide a complex understanding of German protest movements during the 1960s and 1970s within a transnational and transgenerational perspective. Its aim is to review the historical events within its contemporary context and additionally from a present perspective. Ways of understanding and commemorating protest and terrorism in Germany are intended to develop a historiography of German terrorism.

Learning outcomes - On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
- analyze and understand a historical phenomenon such as protest and terrorism within its contemporary context (sources)
- apply methodological and theoretical concepts to a historical phenomenon
- reflect commemoration and memory politics added to a historical event
- relate events from the German past to the development of the German society and present German policy

Attendance requirements(%):
80 %

Teaching arrangement and method of instruction: The teaching is based on reading and discussing key texts, class presentations, group work and individual assignments. Additionally historical context and contextualizing constellations are introduced and presented.

Course/Module Content:
The course is based on a chronological overview of the developments within the German left from the beginnings of the 1968 student movement to the terror attacks by radical factions of the movement.

1) INTRODUCTION - 17 October 2018

2) THREE REFERENCE FRAMES OF 1968 - 24 October 2018

3) THE ADVENT OF 1968 IN WEST GERMANY - 31 October 2018

4) EAST GERMANY'S 1968 - 7 November 2018

5) (ANTI-) WAR AND LIBERATION: NATIONAL AND TRANSNATIONAL OBJECTIVES - 14 November 2018

6) THE PATH TOWARDS TERRORISM - 21 November 2018

7) STRATEGIES: THE URBAN GUERILLA - 28 November 2018

8) THE RED ARMY FACTION AND THE GERMAN AUTUMN - 5 December 2018

9) FEAR, VIOLENCE AND THE QUESTION OF GERMAN GUILT - 19 December 2018

10) THE REVOLUTIONARY CELLS AND THE RETURN OF THE PAST IN ENTEBBE - 12 December 2018

11) GERMAN TERRORISM IN CINEMATIC AND CULTURAL MEMORY - 26 December 2018

12) THE POLITICAL LEGACY OF TERRORISM - 2 January 2018

13) TOWARDS AN AUTORITARIAN REVOLT? 1968 TODAY - 9 January 2018

14) CONCLUSION - 16 January 2018

Required Reading:
Siegfried, Detlef, "Understanding 1968: Youth Rebellion, Generational Change and Postindustrial Society." Between Marx and Coca-Cola: Youth Cultures in Changing European Societies, 1960-1980. Ed. Axel Schildt and Detlef Siegfried. New York: Berghahn, 2006: 59-81.

Herf, Jeffrey. "An Age of Murder: Ideology and Terror in Germany." Telos 144 (2008): 8-37.

Kraushaar, Wolfgang. Hitlers Children? The German 1968 Movement in the Shadow of the Nazi Past. Memories of 1968: International Perspectives. Ed. Sarah Waters and Ingo Cornils (Oxford/New York: Peter Lang, 2010) 79-101.

Jobs, Richard Ivan. "Youth Movements: Travel, Protest, and Europe in 1968." The American Historical Review 114:2 (2009): 376-404.

Leggewie, Claus. "A Laboratory of Postindustrial Society: Reassessing the 1960s in Germany." 1968 The World Transformed. Ed. Carole Fink, Philipp Gassert, Detlef Junker (Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1998): 277-294.

Additional Reading Material:
Cornils, Ingo and Gerrit-Jan Berendse (eds.), Baader-Meinhof Returns: History and Cultural Memory of Left-wing Terrorism (Amsterdam/New York: Rodopi, 2008)

Klimke, Martin and Joachim Scharloth (eds.), 1968 in Europe: A History of Protest and Activism, 1956-1977 (New York: Palgrave, 2008)

Kundnani, Hans, Utopia or Auschwitz: Germany's 1968 Generation and the Holocaust (New York: Columbia Press, 2009)

Course/Module evaluation:
End of year written/oral examination 0 %
Presentation 25 %
Participation in Tutorials 0 %
Project work 50 %
Assignments 10 %
Reports 15 %
Research project 0 %
Quizzes 0 %
Other 0 %

Additional information:
 
Students needing academic accommodations based on a disability should contact the Center for Diagnosis and Support of Students with Learning Disabilities, or the Office for Students with Disabilities, as early as possible, to discuss and coordinate accommodations, based on relevant documentation.
For further information, please visit the site of the Dean of Students Office.
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