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Syllabus PRIVACY, TECHNOLOGY AND NEW MEDIA - 50974

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Last update 26-10-2014
HU Credits: 2

Degree/Cycle: 2nd degree (Master)

Responsible Department: Communication and Journalism

Semester: 1st Semester

Teaching Languages: Hebrew

Campus: Mt. Scopus

Course/Module Coordinator: Nicholas John

Coordinator Email: n.john@huji.ac.il

Coordinator Office Hours: Tuesday, 10-11, or by appointment

Teaching Staff:
Dr. Nicholas John

Course/Module description:
The modern history of privacy is inherently a history of modern technologies as well, as new ways of documenting everyday life and enabling communication at a distance have all given rise to concerns that our privacy is being endangered in unprecedented ways. During the course we shall examine the concept of privacy itself; the so-called privacy paradox, whereby we claim to care deeply about our privacy while behaving as if we dont; different approaches to privacy and personhood; privacy, power and class; privacy and generational transformations; state surveillance and the rise of the database nation; and the culture of self-exposure and sharing on talk shows, reality TV and Facebook.

Course/Module aims:
This course aims to familiarize students with the key issues in todays debates over questions of privacy and technology, and particularly our use of social media.

Learning outcomes - On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
1) Compare different definitions of privacy and point to the differences between them
2) Evaluate claims in popular discourse about privacy
3) Analyze the relationship between privacy and technology
4) Critique state and commercial use of technologies of surveillance

Attendance requirements(%):
100

Teaching arrangement and method of instruction: Frontal lectures with class discussion and student presentations of articles. For those writing seminar papers, a presentation of their topic, research question and initial literature review.

Course/Module Content:
The issues this course will discuss include:
* Definitions of privacy
* The relationship between privacy and technology
* Privacy and social media
* Privacy and teens
* Privacy, power and class
* Privacy and surveillance

Required Reading:
Warren, S. D., & Brandeis, L. D. (1890). The Right to Privacy. Harvard Law Review, 4, 193-220.

Whitman, James Q. (2004). The Two Western Cultures of Privacy: Dignity Versus Liberty. Yale Law Journal, 113, 1151-1221.


Gilman, Michele Estrin. (2012). The Class Differential in Privacy Law. Brooklyn Law Review, 77(4), 1389-1445.

Norberg, Patricia A., Horne, Daniel R., & Horne, David A. (2007). The Privacy Paradox: Personal Information Disclosure Intentions versus Behaviors. Journal of Consumer Affairs, 41(1), 100-126. doi: 10.1111/j.1745-6606.2006.00070.x

Turow, Joseph, Hennessy, Michael, & Bleakley, Amy. (2008). Consumers understanding of privacy rules in the marketplace. Journal of Consumer Affairs, 42(3), 411-424.

Lyon, David. (2003a). Introduction. In D. Lyon (Ed.), Surveillance as social sorting : privacy, risk, and digital discrimination (pp. 1-9). London ; New York: Routledge.
Lyon, David. (2003b). Surveillance as social sorting: Computer codes and mobile bodies. In D. Lyon (Ed.), Surveillance as social sorting : privacy, risk, and digital discrimination (pp. 13-30). London ; New York: Routledge.
Tene, Omer. (2013). : . , (2), 421-467.
Klinger, Jonathan. (2007). . Retrieved from http://2jk.org/praxis/?p&eq;1111
Klinger, Jonathan. (2010). , . Retrieved from http://2jk.org/praxis/?p&eq;2659

Zarsky, Tal Z. (2002). Mine your own business: making the case for the implications of the data mining of personal information in the forum of public opinion. Yale JL & Tech., 5, 1.

Livingstone, Sonia. (2008). Taking risky opportunities in youthful content creation: teenagers' use of social networking sites for intimacy, privacy and self-expression. New Media & Society, 10(3), 393.

boyd, danah, & Marwick, Alice. (2011). Social Privacy in Networked Publics: Teens Attitudes, Practices, and Strategies. Paper presented at the A Decade in Internet Time: Symposium on the Dynamics of the Internet and Society, Oxford Internet Institute.

Additional Reading Material:
Student presentations:



, . (2010). . , .
', 37-55

Gilman, Michele Estrin. (2012). The Class Differential in Privacy Law. Brooklyn Law Review, 77(4), 1389-1445.

Acquisti, Alessandro, & Grossklags, Jens. (2005). Privacy and rationality in individual decision making. Security & Privacy, IEEE, 3(1), 26-33. +

Stutzman, Fred, Gross, Ralph, & Acquisti, Alessandro. (2013). Silent Listeners: The Evolution of Privacy and Disclosure on Facebook. Journal of Privacy and Confidentiality, 4(2), 7-41.

Lyon, David. (2003a). Introduction. In D. Lyon (Ed.), Surveillance as social sorting : privacy, risk, and digital discrimination (pp. 1-9). London ; New York: Routledge.
Lyon, David. (2003b). Surveillance as social sorting: Computer codes and mobile bodies. In D. Lyon (Ed.), Surveillance as social sorting : privacy, risk, and digital discrimination (pp. 13-30). London ; New York: Routledge.

Richards, Neil M. (2013). The dangers of surveillance. Harvard Law Review, 126(7), 1934-1965.

boyd, danah. (2007). Why Youth ♥ Social Network Sites: The Role of Networked Publics in Teenage Social Life. In D. Buckingham (Ed.), Youth, Identity and Digital Media (pp. 119-142). Cambridge: The MIT Press.

Naftali, Orna. (2010). Caged golden canaries: Childhood, privacy and subjectivity in contemporary urban China. Childhood, 17(3), 297-311. doi: 10.1177/0907568209345612


Extra and very useful reading:
Altman, Irwin. (1976). Privacy: A Conceptual Analysis. Environment and Behavior, 8(1), 7-29. doi: Doi 10.1177/001391657600800102
Cohen, Julie E. (2013). What privacy is for. Harvard Law Review, 126(7), 1904-1933.
DeCew, Judith Wagner. (2012). Privacy. In E. N. Zalta (Ed.), The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
Lessig, Lawrence. (2006). Code: Version 2.0. New York: Basic Books.
Moore, Adam D. (2008). Defining Privacy. Journal of Social Philosophy, 39(3), 411-428. doi: Doi 10.1111/J.1467-9833.2008.00433.X
Rykwert, Joseph. (2001). Privacy in Antiquity. Social Research, 68(1), 29-40.
Solove, Daniel J. (2002). Conceptualizing privacy. California Law Review, 1087-1155.
Westin, Alan F. (1967). Privacy and Freedom. New York: Atheneum.

John, Leslie K, Acquisti, Alessandro, & Loewenstein, George. (2011). Strangers on a plane: context-dependent willingness to divulge sensitive information. Journal of consumer research, 37(5), 858-873.
Acquisti, Alessandro. (2013, 30/3/2013). Letting Down Our Guard With Web Privacy, The New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/31/technology/web-privacy-and-how-consumers-let-down-their-guard.html
Laura Brandimarte, Alessandro Acquisti & George Loewenstein, Misplaced Confidences: Privacy and the Control Paradox, (Sept. 2010) (unpublished manuscript), available at http://www.futureofprivacy.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/Misplaced-Confidences-acquisti-FPF.pdf.



Marwick, A. E., Murgia-Diaz, D., & Palfrey Jr., J. G. (2010). Youth, Privacy and Reputation (Literature Review): The Berkman Center for Internet & Society.
Marx, Gary, & Steeves, Valerie. (2010). From the Beginning: Children as Subjects and Agents of Surveillance. Surveillance & Society, 7(3/4), 192-230.
Shmueli, Benjamin, & Blecher-Prigat, Ayelet. (2011). Privacy for Children. Columbia Human Rights Law Review, 42.
Steeves, Valerie, & Jones, Owain. (2010). Editorial: Surveillance, Children and Childhood. Surveillance & Society, 7(3/4), 187-191.
Herring, Susan C. (2007). Questioning the Generational Divide: Technological Exoticism and Adult Constructions of Online Youth Identity. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Media and Learning, -, 71-92. doi: doi:10.1162/dmal.9780262524834.071


Solove, Daniel J. (2007). 'I've Got Nothing to Hide'and Other Misunderstandings of Privacy. San Diego law review, 44, 745-772.
Stalder, Felix, & Lyon, David. (2003). Electronic identity cards and social classification. In D. Lyon (Ed.), Surveillance as social sorting : privacy, risk, and digital discrimination (pp. 77-93). London ; New York: Routledge.

Course/Module evaluation:
End of year written/oral examination 0 %
Presentation 15 %
Participation in Tutorials 0 %
Project work 85 %
Assignments 0 %
Reports 0 %
Research project 0 %
Quizzes 0 %
Other 0 %

Additional information:
From the third week of the semester, students will present an article to the class (in pairs). The list of articles and dates will be published later.
Students who choose to write a seminar paper will present their topic to the class and will submit their planned research in writing.
 
Students needing academic accommodations based on a disability should contact the Center for Diagnosis and Support of Students with Learning Disabilities, or the Office for Students with Disabilities, as early as possible, to discuss and coordinate accommodations, based on relevant documentation.
For further information, please visit the site of the Dean of Students Office.
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